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20130331
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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Mar 18, 2013 12:00am PDT
democrat or a republican. it doesn't care whether you're liberal or conservative. climate change will affect all americans no matter what your political beliefs, your religious beliefs, your race, class, creed, et cetera, okay. and in the end, the only way we're going to deal with this issue is if we come together as a country and have a serious conversation, not about is it real. but what can we do about it. >> announcer: funding is provided by -- carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful
PBS
Mar 30, 2013 4:00pm PDT
profound change in the course of american jurisprudence. >> gideon was a drifter with a criminal record, charged with breaking and entering and robbing a pool hall in florida. denied representation, he defended himself and was sentenced to five years in state prison. from his cell, he exercised his right to petition the supreme court for a fair hearing. when the justices ruled in gideon's favor, hundreds of prisoners who also had been denied their legal rights were freed or given new trials and our current system of public defenders was born. but 50 years later that system is floundering. when gideon v. wainwright was decided, fewer than half of all defendants were poor. now, over 80% are. of the 2.2 million inmates in the united states, more than 60% are members of racial and ethnic minorities, and the law puts a disproportionate number of them on death row. bryan stevenson found his calling defending the poor and least powerful among us. straight from harvard law school he went south, eventually to create the equal justice initiative in alabama, the state with the highest per capita r
PBS
Mar 1, 2013 11:00pm PST
>>> this week on "moyers & company" -- >> evolution and climate change aren't scientifically controversial, but they are controversial to louisiana legislators. and basically everyone who looked at this law knew it was just a backdoor to sneak creationism into public school science classes. >>> and -- >> i never do debates about the existence of god. why would you do that? who are you going to convince? i like to talk about public issues. >> announcer: funding is provided by -- carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to buil
PBS
Mar 22, 2013 11:00pm PDT
regulators. >> where were the regulators? >> i don't know. i think we need a culture change with the regulators. i talk about this a lot in my book. you've got a lot of good-will intentioned people, but they confuse bank profitability with bank safety and soundness. they're not the same thing. there's the right way and there's a wrong way to make money. they're almost aligning themselves to bank managers and wanting to have the appearance of profitability because they think that makes a sound banking system. it's really upside down. you can't ignore the problems here. some of that is overlooked. >> we thought we were going to get a culture change after the big crash. >> yeah, well, i think it's coming slowly but not fast enough. it's amazing that, you know, so many years after the crisis less than half of the dodd frank rules have been completed. a lot of them are watered down. >> by? >> well, the regulators have come to do this. some of the provisions in dodd frank had too many provisions, but we get more exceptions when these proposals come out such as the volcker rule. we get thes
PBS
Mar 24, 2013 6:30pm PDT
brother john died of aids. marie howe, who said, "john's living and dying changed my aesthetic entirely." >> the gate. i had no idea that the gate i would step through to finally enter this world would be the space my brother's body made. he was a little taller than me: a young man but grown, himself by then, done at twenty-eight, having folded every sheet, rinsed every glass he would ever rinse under the cold and running water. this is what you have been waiting for, he used to say to me. and i'd say, what? and he'd say, this -- holding up my cheese and mustard sandwich. and i would say, what? and he would say, this, sort of looking around. ♪ >>> this week on "moyers & company" -- >> they confuse bank profitable with bank safety and soundness. they're not the same things. there's a right way and a wrong way. >>> and your questions for richard wolf. >> professor wolf. >> professor wolf. >> we'll answer the question. >>> funding is provided by carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of the fiphilanthropy. the coleberg foundation with support from the partridge
PBS
Mar 3, 2013 6:30pm PST
will change dramatically. plants and animals will be forced to adapt, move, or go extinct. already, the distribution and life cycles of plants, animals and fish, are shifting in response to changes in earth's climate. in the north sea, warming water has driven commercially important fish such as cod, farther north to colder and deeper waters. in turn, more exotic, warmer-water fish have pushed into the range being vacated. the northward shift of the boundary coincides with a rise in temperature of nearly 2 degrees in north sea waters between 1977 and 2001. if the trend continues, atlantic cod will no longer be able to live in the north sea by 2080. the heavy pressure our industrialized society puts on earth drives climate change. whole ecosystems are modified, forcing species to fight for survival in different surroundings. if we understand the rapid changes our activities force the natural world to respond to, we'll learn to make better decisions today that will determine earth's climate tomorrow, and in turn, nature's services on which all of us depend. >>> this week on "moyers & comp
PBS
Mar 10, 2013 6:30pm PDT
think he might have changed his mind about pushing forward if he had anticipated the death and the blood? >> i don't think so. i think that he believed so profoundly in democracy as an idea and so deeply that his oath to protect and preserve the constitution of the united states meant that secession was not to be allowed. he didn't believe the states had seceded. he believed that the states were still there and that these criminals who were in rebellion against the united states had taken over the apparatuses of the states. so it was a fight over who was going to control reconstruction as well as i think a philosophical, no, the constitution doesn't mention slavery and it doesn't mention secession. so whether or not it's permissible, you know, the way that you get out of the union once you're in is not something i think wisely that the founding fathers decided to, you know, address. and it left the question open, and lincoln's interpretation which i agree with is, you know, you can't opt out of civilization. you can't opt out of the social contract. and secession is another name fo
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)